Reasons to NOT do NaNoWriMo, and why those reasons are bogus!

It’s that time of year again when hundreds of thousands of writers and would-be writers converge on a global scale to unleash the novel within them. And every year there’s a new group of eye-rolling naysayers that complain that NaNoWriMo is the opposite of what any writer should do.

I’m here to dispel these arguments once and for all.

Argument #1: NaNoWriMo confuses discipline with motivation

Here the argument is that one should write every day in order to excel at something instead of getting excited and running right out of the gate. And, there’s some truth to that. You can’t expect to write for 30 days out of 365 and become a master storyteller.

That’s not what NaNoWriMo is. WriMo is about breaking through the barrier that is the blank page. It’s about having writing coaches and encouragement. It’s about learning that “waiting for your Muse” is no way for anyone to get better or even do ANYTHING.

NaNo takes the motivation and excitement, builds on it, and makes you keep going for 30 days. At the end of 30 days, I’ve met few who reach the 50k goal and DON’T keep writing. Why? Simply put, it creates discipline.

Argument #2: NaNoWriMo trivializes the writing process

This comes from “serious” writers and authors who have toiled and tormented over their work for decades and expects the same from you even when you first start out.

Their argument rests on the fact that they have long since forgotten how they started out as a writer. Sitting in their room at 14 and scratching away at their composition notebook. They didn’t toil and bleed then. It grew into a craft. NaNo says it’s time to up your game from the short scribblings and “plans” to write that novel.

Sure, some people write during NaNo and don’t write the rest of the year. Those people will never publish and probably have zero interest in publishing. They’re just having a little fun living in a world they created. The rest of us treat it and the craft with the utmost respect.

Argument #3: Writing a novel is a year-round process

So true. Nobody said that come December 1st you have a finished novel that is then ready for publication.

WriMo is for getting the words down on paper. It’s a first draft. It’s getting you over the biggest hurdles: the blank page and the Internal Editor. It lets you unabashedly try new things, new ideas, new plot points, that you wouldn’t allow yourself to consider otherwise. Heck, it pushes you to work out all the details so you can then go back (AFTER NOVEMBER OF COURSE) and edit and perfect the word choice and grammar.

There are a small percentage that write in November and then try to publish in December, but that’s not the majority and those people are off anyway. Then again, 1% of 400,000 + people is still WAY more than any agent or publisher wants to see in December.

Argument 4: Word count isn’t everything

This might be true. And in WriMo, we only care about word count. But the serious WriMos still consider the words in that count counts for something. Most don’t just drop gobbledygook.

But again, remember, NaNo is just as much about building discipline and building muscle (both imagination muscles and typing/writing muscles) as it about word count. It’s just that word count is a quantifiable goal. Just like Book In A Week which uses page numbers as the goal.

Conclusion

A lot of writers, myself included, need goals and deadlines. NaNo provides both and does so in a fun and entertaining way.

For me, I use NaNoWriMo to write the first draft of my new novel. I spend the rest of the year editing, writing short stories, rewriting, and submitting older novels and short stories. I need the kick in the pants to get past the dreaded Blank Page. And writing a full novel from nothing is daunting. November gets me over that hump in a way that’s fun for me. This is true of many many other WriMos.

There’s nothing damaging about WriMo and nothing bad about it. But like anything fun, misused it because a problem. If you ONLY write anything in November, you lose. If you submit your 1st draft of ANYTHING to any agent or publisher, you’re bonkers!

 

 

2 thoughts on “Reasons to NOT do NaNoWriMo, and why those reasons are bogus!

  1. I was rolling right along with my Kabbalistic-daemonic-Talmudic-picaresque chapter-per-week novel, “My Study Partner is a Vampire,” when I got the flu and let it go. Since that time, I’ve been distracted by my two college teaching jobs and my weekend Sabbath rabbi job, and let it drift. The spark is gone. There are always papers to grade.
    I must go back to my blog– I was posting chapters weekly there for the cheap-chapter-serial-thrill of seeing my numbers of readers world-blog-wide– and collect all the chapters in a bunch, clock the direction of the Thing, and gauge its overall movement.
    Or do I just keep writing, chapter by chapter? A puzzlement.
    And what do I do about NaNoWriMo? I do well under pressure: an hour here, a half-hour there, but the Fire is gone, or banked, at least.
    I need a house call from my Bent-winged Muse. (She, like me, is far from perfect)

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